Solar PV Modules by Pioneers from Japan – Kyocera Solar

An Interview @REI 2016

Kyocera is one of the pioneers in solar PV module manufacturing. They have been developing PV cells since the first oil crisis in early 1970s. Since then they have been involved in innovating and developing various components in the solar ecosystem – like storage batteries and energy management systems.

Kyocera Corporation is a Japanese multinational electronics and ceramics manufacturer headquartered in Kyoto, Japan. They operate in four principle markets – Environment & Energy, Information & Communication, Automotive and Medical & Healthcare.

The Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics, a third party certification body in Germany, PID tested 13 commercial solar modules from major manufacturers around the world. Kyocera modules were one among the very few that showed no decline in output after being subjected to high-voltage stress testing, demonstrating potential for long-term reliability.

Kyocera has over 40 years of pioneering experience in solar and they are present in India for over 10 years. They have a manufacturing capacity of 1.4 GW in total. Cells are manufactured in Japan and the module assembly is done in China, Mexico and Japan.

Solar Mango team was able to catch up with Mr.Kitamura and Mr.Paras Kumar of Kyocera Asia Pacific India Pvt Ltd for a brief interview during the recent REI Expo 2016, held at Noida. A quick snapshot of the interview is given below:


Interview with Kyocera

What are the key products and solutions Kyocera provides to the Indian solar sector?

Kyocera is mainly into solar modules sales in India. We have modules in all sizes and capacity.

Which are the key end user segments for your products and solutions?

Large IPPs and Developers are the key end user segments for us.

What are the highlights and USPs of your products and solutions?

Very low degradation (PID) is the USP of our solar modules. It has been proved time and again.

What are the key learnings you have had from the Indian solar energy sector so far?

India is a very difficult market to crack. It is very cost sensitive and have very little scope for high quality goods here at least for now.

What, according to you, are the key challenges faced by the Indian Solar market?

Unscrupulous price competition is the only major challenge, which I can think of. There is a lot of potential – especially in the distributed market segment. But without quality-consciousness it is tough to realize big dreams.

To know more about Kyocera

Contact – Paras Kumar

Email –

Website –